Making a hardware random number generator

If you want a really good source of random numbers, you should get a hardware generator. But there’s not a lot of great options out there, and most people looking into this get (understandably) paranoid about backdoors. But, there’s a nice trick: if you combine multiple random sources together with xor, it doesn’t matter if one is backdoored, as long as they aren’t all backdoored. There are some exceptions–if the backdoor is actively looking at the output, it can still break your system. But as long as you’re just generating some random pads, instead of making a kernel entropy pool, you’re fine with this trick.

So! We just need a bunch of sources of randomness. Here’s the options I’ve tried:

  • /dev/urandom (40,000KB/s) – this is nearly a pseudo-random number generator, so it’s not that good. But it’s good to throw in just in case. [Learn about /dev/random vs /dev/urandom if you haven’t. Then unlearn it again.]
  • random-stream (1,000 KB/s), an implementation of the merenne twister pseudo-random-number generator. A worse version of /dev/urandom, use that unless you don’t trust the Linux kernel for some reason.
  • infnoise (20-23 KB/s), a USB hardware random number generator. Optionally whitens using keccak. Mine is unfortunately broken (probably?) and outputs “USB read error” after a while
  • OneRNG (55 KiB/s), a USB hardware random number generator. I use a custom script which outputs raw data instead of the provided scripts (although they look totally innocuous, do recommend
  • /dev/hwrng (123 KB/s), which accesses the hardware random number generator built into the raspberry pi. this device is provided by the raspbian package rng-tools. I learned about this option here
  • rdrand-gen (5,800 KB/s), a command-line tool to output random numbers from the Intel hardware generator instruction, RDRAND.

At the end, you can use my xor program to combine the streams/files. Make sure to use limit the output size if using files–by default it does not stop outputting data until EVERY file ends. The speed of the combined stream is at most going to be the slowest component (plus a little slowdown to xor everything). Here’s my final command line:

#!/bin/bash
# Fill up the folder with 1 GB one-time pads. Requires 'rng-tools' and a raspberry pi. Run as sudo to access /dev/hwrng.
while true; do
  sh onerng.sh | dd bs=1K count=1000000 of=tmp-onerng.pad 2>/dev/null
  infnoise --raw | dd bs=1K count=1000000 of=tmp-infnoise.pad 2>/dev/null
  xor tmp-onerng.pad tmp-infnoise.pad /dev/urandom /dev/hwrng | dd bs=1K count=1000000 of=/home/pi/pads/1GB-`\date +%Y-%m-%d-%H%M%S`.pad 2>/dev/null;
done

Great, now you have a good one-time-pad and can join ok-mixnet ūüôā

P.S. If you really know what you’re doing and like shooting yourself in the foot, you could try combining and whitening entropy sources with a randomness sponge like keccak instead.

DIY Hard drive carrying case

Today’s project was a hard drive carrying case. I wanted something to securely store hard drives. When I looked around on ebay and amazon, I saw some nice cases and some crappy plastic molded ones. Even the terrible ones were at least $50, so I made my own.

HDD Carrying Case Exerior

I bought a used ammo case at the rather excellent local army surplus store. Then I padded all sides. I had spare¬†EVA foam¬†“puzzle piece” style mats from a gym setup lying around. I cut out the pieces with scissors. That’s it. ¬†I was expecting more steps, but nothing needed glued in place. I was planning on adding inserts for the empty slots, but it seems secure enough. If you’re making one, you could also glue the top onto the lid, so you don’t have to take it out manually.

HDD Case Interior

Getting the Adafruit Pro Trinket 3.3V to work in Arch Linux

I’m on Linux, and here’s what I did to get the Adafruit Pro Trinket (3.3V version) to work. I think most of this should work for other Adafruit boards as well. I’m on Arch Linux, but other¬†distros will be similar, just find the right paths for everything. Your version of udev may vary on older distros especially.

  1. Install the Arduino IDE. If you want to install the adafruit version, be my guest. It should work out of the box, minus the udev rule below. I have multiple microprocessors I want to support, so this wasn’t an option for me.
  2. Copy the hardware profiles to your Arduino install. pacman -Ql arduino shows me that I should be installing to /usr/share/aduino.  You can find the files you need at their source (copy the entire folder) or the same thing is packaged inside of the IDE installs.
    cp adafruit-git /usr/share/arduino/adafruit
  3. Re-configure “ATtiny85” to work with avrdude. On arch, pacman -Ql arduino | grep "avrdude.conf¬†says I should edit /usr/share/arduino/hardware/tools/avr/etc/avrdude.conf.¬†Paste this revised “t85” section into avrdude.conf¬†(credit¬†to the author)
  4. Install a udev rule so you can program the Trinket Pro as yourself (and not as root).
    # /etc/udev/rules.d/adafruit-usbtiny.rules
    SUBSYSTEM=="usb", ATTR{product}=="USBtiny", ATTR{idProduct}=="0c9f", ATTRS{idVendor}=="1781", MODE="0660", GROUP="arduino"
  5. Add yourself as an arduino¬†group user so you can program the device with usermod -G arduino -a <username>. Reload the udev rules and log in again to refresh the groups you’re in. Close and re-open the Arduino IDE if you have it open to refresh the hardware rules.
  6. You should be good to go! If you’re having trouble, start by making sure you can see the correct hardware, and that avrdude¬†can recognize and program your device with simple test programs from the command link. The source links have some good specific suggestions.

Sources:
http://www.bacspc.com/2015/07/28/arch-linux-and-trinket/
http://andijcr.github.io/blog/2014/07/31/notes-on-trinket-on-ubuntu-14.04/