Getting the Adafruit Pro Trinket 3.3V to work in Arch Linux

I’m on Linux, and here’s what I did to get the Adafruit Pro Trinket (3.3V version) to work. I think most of this should work for other Adafruit boards as well. I’m on Arch Linux, but other distros will be similar, just find the right paths for everything. Your version of udev may vary on older distros especially.

  1. Install the Arduino IDE. If you want to install the adafruit version, be my guest. It should work out of the box, minus the udev rule below. I have multiple microprocessors I want to support, so this wasn’t an option for me.
  2. Copy the hardware profiles to your Arduino install. pacman -Ql arduino shows me that I should be installing to /usr/share/aduino.  You can find the files you need at their source (copy the entire folder) or the same thing is packaged inside of the IDE installs.
  3. Re-configure “ATtiny85” to work with avrdude. On arch, pacman -Ql arduino | grep "avrdude.conf says I should edit /usr/share/arduino/hardware/tools/avr/etc/avrdude.conf. Paste this revised “t85” section into avrdude.conf (credit to the author)
  4. Install a udev rule so you can program the Trinket Pro as yourself (and not as root).
  5. Add yourself as an arduino group user so you can program the device with usermod -G arduino -a <username>. Reload the udev rules and log in again to refresh the groups you’re in. Close and re-open the Arduino IDE if you have it open to refresh the hardware rules.
  6. You should be good to go! If you’re having trouble, start by making sure you can see the correct hardware, and that avrdude can recognize and program your device with simple test programs from the command link. The source links have some good specific suggestions.

Sources:
http://www.bacspc.com/2015/07/28/arch-linux-and-trinket/
http://andijcr.github.io/blog/2014/07/31/notes-on-trinket-on-ubuntu-14.04/

Archiving all bash commands typed

This one’s a quickie. Just a second of my config to record all bash commands to a file (.bash_eternal_history) forever. The default bash HISTFILESIZE is 500. Setting it to a non-numeric value will make the history file grow forever (although not your actual history size, which is controlled by HISTSIZE).

I do this in addition:

Archiving all web traffic

Today I’m going to walk through a setup on how to archive all web (HTTP/S) traffic passing over your Linux desktop. The basic approach is going to be to install a proxy which records traffic. It will record the traffic to WARC files. You can’t proxy non-HTTP traffic (for example, chat or email) because we’re using an HTTP proxy approach.

The end result is pretty slow for reasons I’m not totally sure of yet. It’s possible warcproxy isn’t streaming results.

  1. Install the server
  2. Make a warcprox user to run the proxy as.
  3. Make a root certificate. You’re going to intercept HTTPS traffic by pretending to be the website, so if anyone gets ahold of this, they can fake being every website to you. Don’t give it out.
  4. Set up a directory where you’re going to store the WARC files. You’re saving all web traffic, so this will get pretty big.
  5. Set up a boot script for warcproxy. Here’s mine. I’m using supervisorctl rather than systemd.
  6. Set up any browers, etc to use localhost:18000 as your proxy. You could also do some kind of global firewall config. Chromium in particular was pretty irritating on Arch Linux. It doesn’t respect $http_proxy, so you have to pass it separate options. This is also a good point to make sure anything you don’t want recorded BYPASSES the proxy (for example, maybe large things like youtube, etc).

Mail filtering with Dovecot

This expands on my previous post about how to set up an email server.

We’re going to set up a few spam filters in Dovecot under Debian. We’re going to use Sieve, which lets the user set up whichever filters they want. However, we’re going to run a couple pre-baked spam filters regardless of what the user sets up. Continue reading

Installing email with Postfix and Dovecot (with Postgres)

I’m posting my email setup here. The end result will:

  • Use Postfix for SMTP
  • Use Dovecot for IMAP and authentication
  • Store usernames, email forwards, and passwords in a Postgres SQL database
  • Only be accessible over encrypted channels
  • Pass all common spam checks
  • Support SMTP sending and IMAP email checking. I did not include POP3 because I don’t use it, but it should be easy to add
  • NOT add spam filtering or web mail (this article is long enough as it is, maybe in a follow-up)

Continue reading

Dependency Resolution in Javascript

Sometimes I have a bunch of dependencies. Say, UI components that need other UI components to be loaded. I’d really just like to have everything declare dependencies and magically everything is loaded in the right order. It turns out that if use “require” type files this isn’t bad (google “dependency injection”), but for anything other than code loading you’re a bit lost. I did find dependency-graph, but this requires the full list of components to run. I wanted a version would you could add components whenever you wanted–an online framework.

My take is here: https://github.com/vanceza/dependencies-online

It has no requirements, and is available on npm as dependencies-online.

Archiving Twitch

Install jq and youtube-dl

Get a list of the last 100 URLs:

Save them locally:

Did it. youtube-dl is smart enough to avoid re-downloading videos it already has, so as long as you run this often enough (I do daily), you should avoid losing videos before they’re deleted.

Thanks jrayhawk for the API info.