2020 books

Here’s a list of books I read in 2020. The ones in bold I recommend.

Fiction:

A College of Magics by Caroline Stevermer
A Crucible of Souls by Mitchell Hogan
Alcatraz and the Evil Librarians by Brandon Sanderson
A Memory Called Empire, by Arkady Martine
Apex (Nexus 3) by Ramez Naam
A Practical Guide to Evil, to end of book 5
Arena by Holly Jennings
Ariel by Steven Barnett
Ascend Online by Luke Chmilenko
Bastard Operator from Hell
Circe, by Madeline Miller
City of Brass by S A Chakrabarty p1-460
Cold Comfort Farm by Stella Gibbons
Colour out of Space by HP Lovecraft
Crux (Nexus 2) by Ramez Naam
Cryptonomicon by Neal Stephenson
Cultivation Chat Group – ch1-56
Dark Lord of Derholm by Dianna Wynne Jones
Dayworld by Philip Jose Farmer
Dayworld Rebel by Philip Jose Farmer # gave up halfway
Dust by Hugh Howey
Emperor Mage by Tamora Pierce
Enchantress by James Maxwell
Exhalation by Ted Chiang
Fall by Neal Stephenson p1-545
Forging Divinity by Andrew Rowe
Future Indefinite by Dave Duncan
Futuristic Tales of the Here and Now by Cory Doctrow
Ghostwater by Will Wight
Gideon the Ninth by Tansyn Muir
House of Blades by Will Wight
House of Earth and Blood by Sarah Maas
Ithenalin’s Restoration by Lawrence Watt-Evans
Lament by Maggie Stiefvater
Legacy of the Fallen by Luke Chmilenko p1-316
Lone Wolf / Kai adventure series 1-5, magnakai 1, by Joe Dever
Magic for Liars by Sarah Gailey
Magician by Raymond Feist
Magicians by Lev Grossman
Making Money by Terry Pratchett
Mirror Gate by Jeff Wheeler
New York Fantastic by Paula Guran
Nexus by Ramez Naam
Night of Madness by Lawrence Watt-Evans
Ninth House by Leigh Bardogo
Od Magic by Patricia McKillip p1-222
One Word Kill by Mark Lawrence
On the Shoulders of Titans by Andrew Rowe
Past Imperative by Dave Duncan
Piranesi by Susanna Clarke
Present Tense by Dave Duncan
Prince of Thorns by Mark Lawrence
Priory of the Orange Tree by Samantha Shannon, p1-534?
Rage of Dragons by Evan Winter (some)
Relics of War by Lawrence Watt-Evans
Starfish (Rifters 1) by Peter Watts
Shades of Milk and Honey by Mary Robinette Kowal (all)
Shift (Silo 6-8) by Hugh Howey
Shining Path by Matthew Skala
Shouldn’t You Be In School? by Lemony Snicket
Sister Sable, by T Mountebank, p1-378
Skysworn by Will Wight
Skyward by Brandon Sanderson
Snowspelled by Stephanie Burges
Spellmonger by Terry Mancour, p1-165
Starfish by Peter Watts
Stone Unturned by Lawrence Watt-Evans
Storm Glass by Jeff Wheeler
Sufficiently Advanced Magic by Andrew Rowe
The Alien’s Lover by Zoey Draven
The Archived by Victoria Schwab
The Atrocity Archive by Charles Stross
The Blood of a Dragon by Lawrence Watt-Evans
The Burning White (Lightbringer 5) by Brent Weeks
The Collapsing Empire by John Scalzi
The Diamond Age by Neal Stephenson
The Fractured World by David Aries
The Goblin Emperor by Katherine Addison
The Library at Mount Char by Scott Hawkins
The Magic Goes Away by Larry Niven
The Maker of Universes by Philip Jose Farmer
The Misenchanted Sword by Lawrence Watt-Evans
The Mysterious Study of Doctor Sex by Tamsyn Muir
The Necromancer’s House by Christopher Buehlman
The Queen’s Poisoner by Jeff Wheeler
The Rook by Daniel O’Malley
The Sorcerer’s Widow by Lawrence Watt-Evans
The Spell of the Black Dagger by Lawrence Watt-Evans
The Spriggan Mirror by Lawrence Watt-Evans
The Unwilling Warlord by Lawrence Watt-Evans
The Vondish Ambassador by Lawrence Watt-Evans
The Warrior Heir by Cinda Williams Chima, p1-116
The Wiz Biz by Rick Cook
The Woven Ring by MD Presley, p1-28
Three-Body Problem by Cixin Liu
Three Men in a Boat by Jerome K. Jerome
Twig by wildbow (arc 1-18)
Uncrowned by Will Wight
Underlord by Will Wight
Unsong by Scott Alexander
Unsouled by Will Wight
When Did You See Her Last? by Lemony Snicket
Wintersteel by Will Wight
With a Single Spell by Lawrence Watt-Evans
Wool by Hugh Howey (v1-5)

Nonfiction (mostly I read web nonfiction):

507 Mechanical Movements by Henry T Brown
Advanced Magick for Beginners by Alan Chapman
Broadcast Channels with Confidential Messages
Busy Beaver Frontier by Scott Aaronson. I did some work based on it.
Computational Geometry by Mark de Berg
Craeft by Alexander Langlands
D&D 5e Player’s Handbook
D&D 5e Dungeon Master’s Guide
Forrest Mem’s Notebook
Forrest Mim’s Engineer’s Notebook
Forrest Mim’s Mini Notebook
Intel’s x86-64 manual
Introduction to Analysis by Maxwell Rosenlicht
Kademelia by Peter Maymounkov
kleiman v wright australian tax document
Incremental String Searching by Bertrand Meyer (KNP algorithm)
Rules to One Night Ultimate Werewolf
The Art of Computer Programming, v1, v3 by Donald Knuth (parts)
The Pragmatic Programmer
The Rust Programming Language
There’s Plenty of Room at the Bottom by Richard Feynman
Total Money Makeover by Dave Ramsey
W65025 manual (6502 clone)

The life-changing magic of tidying up

Summary of “the life-changing magic of tidying up”:

Marie Kondo writes the “KonMari” method. The book ends up being as much about her mistakes in learning how to tidy as it is about how to tidy. The book conveys a certain positive energy that makes me want to recommend it, but the author also brings that energy in reaction to a kind of previous stress which accompanied tidying, which she does not seem to have completely dropped–if you are mysteriously anxious and feel you MUST discard everything after reading her book, this may be why.

The primary point she makes is meant to cure it: Decide what to keep and what to discard by physically touching each item, and asking if it brings you joy.

The rest of the method:

  • Positivity. Everything in your house loves and wants to help you. If it is time to send off some of the items on their next adventure, this is no reason to be sad or anxious. You had a great time meeting, and they and you were both happy.
  • Tidy all at once (at least by category, but preferably in a multi-day binge).
  • Physically gather the category in once place, touching everything and asking if it brings you joy.
  • Find out what you’ll keep and discard before putting things away or organizing.
  • Organizing: ??? [I didn’t get any big takeaways here].

Marie Kondo’s best advice is realizations from her past mistakes–the sort of methods which seems reasonable to try, but end up being wrong for subtle reasons. They are:

  • Tidy by category, not place. Otherwise, you won’t realize everything you have.
  • “Storage” is storing things neatly, and lets you have more and more things. This is different than tidying, which is about bringing things in harmony, and having only things you love. Becoming better at “storage” can make you unhappy.

She also has encountered her clients making mistakes. For each category of things (clothes, books, etc) there are many reasons clients may not want to throw something out. Most of the book is meant to illustrate why these things are useless, and why throwing them out is okay and will make you happier.

The fun part is that many clients were more confident and more in touch with what they valued and who they wanted once they had only possessions they loved.

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